Frequently Asked Questions:
(click on your question)

•What are Indestructibles made of?
What kind of paper are Indestructibles printed on?
Why are there no words?
What do you mean Indestructibles "grow with my baby"?

Why don’t Indestructibles have a cover or spine?
Are Indestructibles Safe?
Are Indestructibles BPA-, phthalate-, PVC-, and lead-free?
How can I wash my Indestructibles?
I thought babies liked high-contract black/white illustrations - these have colorful pictures on colorful backgrounds. Why?
Seriously, isn’t my baby going to destroy an Indestructible if I give her free reign with it?


What are Indestructibles made of that is so durable yet paper-like and delightful for my baby?
Indestructibles are printed on a synthetic material made from flashspun high-density polyethylene fibers (getting technical here, we know). It feels like paper, but liquid water cannot pass through it and it is very difficult to tear. 

What kind of paper are Indestructibles printed on?
Though it feels like paper and is deliciously crinkly for your baby, Indestructibles aren't technically made of paper. To learn more about the material, see “What are Indestructibles made of.”

Why are there no words?
Indestructibles are intentionally wordless in order to encourage dialogic reading (that’s education-speak for “natural conversation”) between parent and baby. Dialogic reading is likely to help an infant develop early literacy skill such as phonological awareness, vocabulary, and narrative skills. For more about Indestructibles and Early Literacy, visit our Educational Information page.

What do you mean "Indestructibles grow with my baby"?
Indestructibles have something unique to offer babies at all their developmental stages between 0 and 2, whether it is a tactile experience, a visual experience, a picture-identifying experience, a story-telling experience. Because they are wordless, your conversation can change as your baby develops, understands, and interacts with you more and more. Here are some examples of ways a baby might use an Indestructible at different developmental stages (these are just examples. All babies differ, of course):

0 months: baby enjoys hearing your voice and seeing you turn colorful pages.
4 months: baby may reach out and touch the book with her own hands.
6 months: baby can chew and explore the books with his own mouth.
9 months: baby can start learning to turn pages by herself.
12 months: baby can start to identify the animals in the pictures and soon say their names.
18 months: baby can talk about the animals and what they are doing.
2 years: baby and mommy can tell stories about what might be happening in the book.

Why don’t Indestructibles have a cover or spine?
Indestructibles’ pages are virtually indestructible, and a typical cover simply isn’t necessary to protect them. We have found that the addition of an outside cover or spine diminishes the appeal for babies who really want the tactile experience of playing with the pages.

Are Indestructibles safe?
Yes. Indestructibles have been safety tested for ages 0+ and conform to ASTM F963 Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Toy Safety and CPSIA Guidelines.

Are Indestructibles BPA-, phthalate-, PVC-, and lead-free?
Yes on all counts. Indestructibles contain none of these substances and are completely non-toxic.

How can I wash my Indestructibles?
Wash Indestructibles with warm water and mild soap. We recommend throwing them in the tub with your little one, just for the fun of it. :)

I thought babies liked high-contrast black/white illustrations. These have colorful pictures on colorful backgrounds. Why?
Contrary to popular belief, by about 2 months of age your baby is capable of perceiving almost all of the subtle shadings that make our visual world so rich, textured and interesting: shadings in clouds, shadows that are unique to your face; they can even see a white teddy bear on a white couch!

Some excerpts from The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute:

“Until recently, many people, even some experts, thought that infants could not see very much. This idea is not new. William James, the great 19th century philosopher and psychologist, argued that the visual world of infants is a "booming, buzzing confusion." Over the last 30 years, developmental and experimental psychologists have intensely investigated visual development. Curiously, many current baby books have not mentioned newer findings. [There have recently been] important findings about what your baby can see and when each of these visual abilities develop.

[For example,] it is true that objects with patterns having 100% contrast (that is, black-on-white) are the easiest for newborns and young infants to see. However, it is now known that they can distinguish much subtler shades of gray. For example, in the first month babies can distinguish two shades of gray that differ by only 5% in gray level (5% contrast). As good as that is, by 9 weeks of age, infants' contrast sensitivity becomes 10 times better, so that they can see large patterns or objects that have less than 0.5% contrast. This is nearly as good as adult contrast sensitivity (0.2%). This means is that by about 2 months of age your baby is capable of perceiving almost all of the subtle shadings that make our visual world so rich, textured and interesting: shadings in clouds, shadows that are unique to your face; even see a white teddy bear on a white couch!”

Seriously, isn’t my baby going to destroy an Indestructible if I give her free reign with it?
Nope. Seriously. We haven’t yet had an Indestructible torn or destroyed by a baby. Crinkled, yes, but we’ve heard some moms comment that the more crinkly they get, the more their babies love them.